Energy Labelling

EHI position and engagement

After the Commission published on 15 July 2015 a proposal for a new Regulation on Energy Label, the European Heating Industry has put forward the position on the industry on this crucial subject.

We strongly support today’s energy label because it promotes the most energy-efficient products on the market. But the new proposal puts at risk these great energy efficiency gains. Why? Because it establishes that all labelled product groups – including space and water heaters – should be reviewed and rescaled in the coming years, irrespectively of whether there is a need for it or not. As a result, a very efficient appliance in class A would be downgraded to F. But who would buy an F-class product?

This is why we have put together some messages, which aim to support the current label and help it achieve its great energy efficiency potential:

  • The energy label for heaters is the most important. Space and water heating represents 85% of the energy consumption of EU buildings. Most heating appliances installed in Europe are old and inefficient but the Energy Label has the potential to push for their modernisation, thus helping reach the EU energy and climate goals.
  • The energy label promotes energy efficient products. The Energy Label helps modernisation of inefficient appliances by promoting the best technologies to consumers. It is important that it keeps doing that.
  • Rescaling the label for heating products will slow down energy efficiency. The perverse effect of rescaling will be to slow down the uptake of energy-efficient heaters.
  • Rescaling should be based on overpopulation. The criteria for rescaling should be based on the population of the top classes. Only if and when these are overpopulated, rescaling should take place.
  • The number of label classes should not be reduced. Reducing the number of energy classes would decrease product differentiation, squeezing different products into fewer classes, making it more difficult for consumers to sort them by their efficiency.
  • Database does not replace testing. A database cannot replace the enforcement work of Market Surveillance Authorities, who are able to check compliance thanks to accurate testing activities.

Recent developments

The European Commission is currently evaluating the Energy Labelling Directive and specific aspects of the Ecodesign Directive.

Article 14 of the Energy Labelling Directive (2010/30/EU) requires the Commission to report about its effectiveness to the European Parliament and to the Council before 31 December 2014. As to the Ecodesign Directive (2009/125/EC), the Commission's 2012 review of the directive (COM(2012) 765 final from 17 December 2012) concluded that specific aspects of the directive can be reassessed if appropriate in the 2014 review of the Energy Labelling Directive. The Commission launched this study in order to prepare the review of the Energy Labelling Directive and certain aspects of the Ecodesign Directive.

The activities under this evaluation started in May 2013 and are led by Ecofys (Netherlands), in cooperation with Waide Strategic Efficiency (United Kingdom), SoWatt (France), SEVEn, The Energy Efficiency Center (Czech Republic), ISR University of Coimbra (Portugal), and Öko-Institut (Germany).

More information: http://www.energylabelevaluation.eu

Legislative framework

The recast Energy Labelling Directive (2010/30/EC – “Directive on the indication by labelling and standard product information of the consumption of energy and other resources by energy-related products”) was published in the Official Journal of the EU on 18 June 2010.

The main provisions of the directive:

  • Introduction of new efficiency classes A+, A++ and A+++ on top of the existing A grade for the most energy-saving household products, to reflect technological progress; the total number of classes will be always limited to seven (A+ to F, A++ to E, A+++ to D).
  • Energy classes and the specific products that must labelled will be determined by a Commission working group by means of delegated acts.
  • The directive applies to “energy-related products which have a significant direct or indirect impact on the consumption of energy and, where relevant, on other essential resources during use”.
  • Energy label was extended to energy-using products in the commercial and industrial sectors.
  • The scheme will now also apply to energy-related products, including construction products, which do not consume energy but "have a significant direct or indirect impact" on energy savings.

The deadline for transposition into national law was 20 June 2011, and Member States had to apply the provisions as of 20 July 2011.

Delegated regulations under preparation

  • ENER Lot 15 - Solid fuel boilers
  • ENER Lot 20 - Local space heaters
  • ENTR Lot 6 - Air conditioning and ventilation systems
  • ENER Lot 21 - Central air heating products

Published delegated regulations

Space heaters and combination heaters

Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 811/2013 of 18 February 2013 supplementing Directive 2010/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to the energy labelling of space heaters, combination heaters, packages of space heater, temperature control and solar device and packages of combination heater, temperature control and solar device

Water heaters, hot water storage tanks and packages of water heater and solar device

Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 812/2013 of 18 February 2013 supplementing Directive 2010/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to the energy labelling of water heaters, hot water storage tanks and packages of water heater and solar device

Air conditioners

Commission Delegated Regulation (EU) No 626/2011 of 4 May 2011 supplementing Directive 2010/30/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council with regard to energy labelling of air conditioners